Tuesday, February 14, 2017

LL.M. Candidate Kael Bowling to publish two articles

LL.M. Candidate Kael Bowling has two upcoming articles that are sure to be of great interest.


The first, "Why Did the Organic Chicken Cross the Road?  To See the Proposed Livestock Welfare Rules in the National Organic Program" - Kentucky Journal of Equine, Agriculture, and Natural Resources Law (Spring 2017) will provide an overview of the USDA's proposed animal welfare rules applicable to the National Organic Program.  Specifically, it explains the current statutory and regulatory structure of organic agriculture in the United States.  Then, it outlines a few common industry arguments opposing the rules.  The piece concludes by addressing the industry arguments, ultimately arguing that the proposed rules are consistent with Congressional intent and agency authority.


"Old MacDonald Had a Right-to-Farm: Putting a Humane Twist on Missouri's Right-to-Farm Amendment" - Drake Journal of Agricultural Law (Summer 2017) article details Missouri's constitutional amendment conferring upon its farmers and ranchers the right to "engage in farming and ranching practices."  It examines the relationship between animal welfare organizations--like the Humane Society of the United States--and farmers.  The events that inspired the RTF amendment are considered in the context of this relationship.  The article ultimately offers a solution to bring farmers and animal welfare groups together when drafting RTF amendments.


Congratulations Kael.



Monday, February 13, 2017

Jennie Zwaggerman to serve as President Elect of the AALA






LL.M. Alumna Jennifer Zwagerman elected to serve as President of AALA.



Our congratulations to President-Elect Jennifer Williams Zwagerman who will serve as the new President of the American Agricultural Law Association. Zwagerman said, “I firmly believe in the value of this organization to food and agricultural law and policy professionals, and I’m excited to be a part of ensuring AALA remains strong into the future.  We want AALA to be a resource for our members, and to ensure we encompass all the sectors that are involved in the food and agricultural industry.”


Zwagerman currently serves as the Associate Director of the Drake Agricultural Law Center and Director of Career Development at the Drake University Law School.  She is a graduate of the Drake University Law School, and received her LL.M. in Agricultural Law from the University of Arkansas School of Law.  Zwagerman joined AALA as a law student and has presented at several AALA symposiums since then.  She has served on the AALA Awards Committees, the Communications Committee and the AALA Board of Directors since 2014 where she worked to revise the organization’s by-laws.

Friday, February 10, 2017

Hipp Receives President's Lifetime Achievement Award for Service

We are thrilled to share the newswire story below about our colleague and friend Janie Hipp. A huge and well-deserved honor.

Hipp Receives President's Lifetime Achievement Award for Service

Janie Simms Hipp
Photo by Russell CothrenJanie Simms Hipp
FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — Janie Simms Hipp, director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative in the University of Arkansas School of Law recently received   the President’s Volunteer Service Award for Lifetime Achievement. The award, from the Corporation for National and Community Service, recognized her lifelong dedication to serving the Chickasaw Nation and advancing the nutritional and educational needs of indigenous people across the continent.
The Lifetime Achievement Award is the highest honor conferred by the corporation and is reserved for individuals who contribute more than 4,000 hours of service in their lifetime. The prize, awarded and signed by President Barack Obama in the fall of 2016, was presented to Hipp in January by corporation officials.
“Janie has dedicated her life to expanding opportunities for Native Americans around the country,” said Max Finberg, former director of AmeriCorps VISTA. “She has lived a life of service to others and is extremely deserving of the Presidential Lifetime Volunteer Service Award. Inspired by those who have come before her, she continues to invest in the next generation of Native leaders through the Tribal Youth Summit and otherwise. I am grateful for the chance I had to work with her to improve life throughout Indian Country. She is a shining example of a servant leader and someone deserving of this recognition.”
“It’s hard to imagine anyone who has done more to empower the next generation of leaders in tribal agriculture than Janie,” said Stacy Leeds, dean of the School of Law. “Her dedication and tireless commitment to mentoring and developing others is inspiring.”
Hipp has helped expand efforts to increase nutritional access for tribal communities and protect and promote traditional agricultural knowledge. She is an attorney and graduate of the University of Arkansas School of Law master of laws program in Agricultural and Food Law, the nation’s first advanced law degree program in agricultural and food law.
She is the founder of the United States Department of Agriculture’s Office of Tribal Relations in the Office of the Secretary, and she served two terms on the agency’s Secretary’s Advisory Committee for Beginning Farmers and Ranchers. She also served on two delegations to the United Nations in the areas of women’s issues and Indigenous issues.
About the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative: The initiative enhances health and wellness in tribal communities by advancing healthy food systems, diversified economic development and cultural food traditions in Indian Country. The initiative empowers tribal governments, farmers, ranchers and food businesses by providing strategic planning and technical assistance; by creating new academic and professional education programs in food systems and agriculture; and by increasing student enrollment in land grant universities in food and agricultural related disciplines.
About University of Arkansas School of Law: The University of Arkansas School of Law prepares students for success through a challenging curriculum taught by nationally recognized faculty, unique service opportunities and a close-knit community that puts students first. With alumni in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, two territories and 20 countries, it has been ranked among the top 10 "Best Values in Legal Education" by the National Jurist magazine for four consecutive years and is among the top 46 public law schools, according to U.S. News and World Report.
About the Corporation for National and Community Service/President’s Volunteer Service Award: In 2003, the President’s Council on Service and Civic Participation launched the President's Volunteer Service Award in 2003 to recognize the importance of volunteers to America's strength and national identity and to honor the deeply invested volunteers whose service is multiplied through the inspiration they give others. Today, the program continues as an initiative of the Corporation for National and Community Service, managed in partnership with Points of Light, an international nonprofit with the mission to inspire, equip, and mobilize people to take action to change the world.
About the University of Arkansas: The University of Arkansas provides an internationally competitive education for undergraduate and graduate students in more than 200 academic programs. The university contributes new knowledge, economic development, basic and applied research, and creative activity while also providing service to academic and professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation classifies the University of Arkansas among only 2 percent of universities in America that have the highest level of research activity. U.S. News & World Report ranks the University of Arkansas among its top American public research universities. Founded in 1871, the University of Arkansas comprises 10 colleges and schools and maintains a low student-to-faculty ratio that promotes personal attention and close mentoring.

New LL.M. Faculty Member: Lauren Manning

Lauren Manning Joins University of Arkansas School of Law LL.M. Faculty

We are pleased to announce that Lauren will join us for the spring 2017 academic term as an Adjunct Professor, teaching a new online course in Agricultural Cooperatives & Local Food Systems for the LL.M. Program.

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to agricultural business formation and cooperatives by discussing the importance of considering business entity formation at the outset of any agricultural enterprise. Students will acquire skills necessary in counseling clients and ensuring that they, as practitioners, understand the client’s business needs.

The bulk of the course will be spent analyzing agricultural cooperatives, beginning with the statutory authority for their formation. Next, we will map the procedural rules that apply to cooperatives, including formation, operation, and dissolving the entity. We will then transition to an analysis of cooperatives’ more substantive aspects, including criticism of and praise for their efficacy. We will conclude by discussing the various ways that cooperatives may be used to support local food system development, including providing solutions for problems of scale, supporting food hubs, and promoting rural development.

Lauren Manning is a food and agriculture lawyer based in Fayetteville, Arkansas. After four years in private practice handling a wide variety of civil litigation matters, she joined the LL.M. Program in Agricultural and Food Law at the University of Arkansas School of Law. Manning writes for AgFunderNews, an online news site covering investment and innovation in agriculture technology. She also teaches as an adjunct professor and raises beef cattle, sheep, goats, and laying hens.

Lauren Manning is known for her work helping to create Envisioning Zero Hunger, an interactive research website focused on global hunger issues, presented during the 2016 United Nations World Food Program. Lauren was selected as the 2016 George Washington Law School’s Human Rights Essay Award Winner for her paper on food security in the context of extractive mining in Greenland. And, she was recently featured in a Huffington Post article on the efforts of young people to break into farming, "Millennial Farmers Fight an Uphill Battle. It’s Time To Support Them."

Lauren holds a Masters of Law in Agricultural & Food Law from the University of Arkansas School of Law. She received her J.D. from University of the Pacific, McGeorge School of Law. She has her B.A. degree in Legal Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz. Lauren is admitted to practice law in California.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

New LL.M. Faculty Member Poppy Davis

Poppy Davis joins University of Arkansas


We are pleased to announce that Poppy Davis will join us for the spring 2017 academic term as an Adjunct Professor, teaching a new online course in Agricultural Income Tax for the LL.M. Program.

The course is a survey to introduce common topics in taxation of for farmers and ranchers that covers the basic structure of federal income taxation, common structures of farming and ranching businesses, tax qualities of income and expense, and special topics such as value-added production, self-constructed assets, cooperatives and associations. The emphasis will be on familiarity with major areas of agricultural taxation and awareness of important differences between agricultural taxation and other business types, rather than mastery of particular topics. 

Poppy teaches and advises on agricultural business and policy issues affecting family-scale farms and ranches and non-profits working in food and farming. She provides individual and group training and technical assistance to on a variety of issues including business formation, land tenure, credit, cash flow, taxation, legal liability, including regulatory compliance, and marketing. She also sets up accounting, inventory and budget systems for business and non-profits. She has ongoing affiliations with the Arcadia Center for Sustainable Food and Agriculture, California Farm Link, the Center for Land Based Learning’s California Farm Academy, The Hopi Foundation, The National Farmers Union Beginning Farmer Institute, and the University of California at Santa Cruz Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems Farm Apprentice Program. 

Poppy began her career as a California Certified Public Accountant working in small accounting firms with an emphasis on family-scale farms and ranches and related estates, business, and nonprofit organizations. She translated her intimate knowledge of agricultural issues and farm-family decision-making to the policy arena, working for the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), first for the crop insurance program in the Western Region and most recently as the National Program Leader for Small Farms and Beginning Farmers and Ranchers in Washington, D.C. While at the USDA she served as a member of the management team for Secretary Vilsack’s “Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food” initiative, and co-founded the USDA 4 Veterans, Reservists & Military Families, and Women and Working Lands workgroups. 

Poppy holds a Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics from the University of California at Davis, a Masters in Journalism from Georgetown University, and a Juris Doctor with a certificate in Agricultural Law from Drake University Law School. Poppy is also a past fellow of the California Agricultural Leadership Program (Class 35).
Poppy Davis Joins University of Arkansas School of Law

Monday, February 6, 2017

Federal Farm Programs & Crop Insurance with Allen Olson



This week the LL.M. Program will be hosting Visiting Professor Allen Olson who will be teaching a coursed for us titled "Federal Farm Programs & Crop Insurance". 



























The course, which is unofficially titled "Representing Farmers – Farm Programs, Crop Insurance, and a Few Other Things You Need to Know!" will take place over the span of three days.

A brief summary of the course coverage is below:

Lawyers who represent farmers find over time that the legal assistance that farmers want, and will pay for, is not always what the lawyer thinks those clients need. A lawyer may sometimes be able to educate a farmer as to additional legal needs, but the lawyer cannot neglect the core legal matters affecting farmers if that lawyer wants to stay in business.

Farm subsidies are always near and dear to a farmer’s heart, and in this course, we will briefly look at the history of farm programs and the new 2014 farm bill. We will also talk about some of the practical aspects of structuring farming operations so as to maximize farm program payments.


Allen Olson has been practicing law for over 30 years. Since 1996, his practice has been concentrated primarily on agricultural law including federal farm programs, crop insurance and conservation easements.

Olson represents farmers, ranchers and related businesses in Georgia and nationwide. He helps farmers structure their operations to maximize their farm program payments while complying with USDA rules and also represents farmers and ranchers in federal and state court litigation and in USDA administrative appeals. Olson serves as debtor’s counsel in Chapter 12 farm bankruptcies.

Based in Albany, Georgia, his practice is concentrated on federal farm programs, payment limitations, USDA administrative appeals, crop insurance litigation, conservation easements, farm business planning, farm bankruptcies, and other matters affecting farmers and related agricultural businesses.

Olson received his B.A. from Cornell University in 1971, his J.D. from the University of North Carolina School of Law in 1974, and his LL.M. in Agricultural Law from the University of Arkansas School of Law in 1996. He practiced law in Virginia and Nebraska and taught at the University of Arkansas prior to moving to South Georgia in 2001. Allen has over 30 years of experience as a practicing lawyer in addition to his time spent teaching. He represents farmers throughout Georgia and nationwide.

Olson is a former member of the Board of Directors of the American Agricultural Law Association and is a past Chair of the Agriculture Law Section of the Georgia State Bar. He is the author of numerous articles on agricultural law topics.


We are also excited to announce that Allen will be sitting down with Ozarks at Large while he is here to talk about the importance of crop insurance. More on that to come.

New Opportunities for 2017-18 LL.M. Candidates

The LL.M. Program in Agricultural & Food Law is pleased to announce assistantship and scholarship opportunities for the 2017-18 academic year.  For more information about our academic program, see blog post at LL.M. Program in Agricultural & Food Law.

New LL.M. Assistantship Opportunities 


We will offer three new assistantship opportunities that provide for a full tuition waiver, plus a monthly stipend. Candidates selected for these positions are enrolled as full-time degree candidates in the LL.M. Program, with part time work duties designed to enhance their career development and build their professional resumes. Only face-to-face LL.M. candidates are eligible for these particular positions.

Advisor, The Journal of Food Law & Policy, The Arkansas Law Review, and Arkansas Law Notes
  • This position calls for an LL.M. candidate to help guide the three student-edited publications at the law school, the Journal of Food Law & Policy, the Arkansas Law Review, and Arkansas Law Notes. Duties will include advising the student Boards and assisting with the teaching of a specialized course in scholarly writing. This position will be designated to an LL.M. candidate with a background of service on a law review or journal and a demonstrated interest in academic scholarship. 
Adjunct Instructor, Political Science Pre-Law 
  • This position includes service as an adjunct instructor teaching a course in "The Judicial Process" within the Political Science Department in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. This class explores the the U.S. legal system and is designed for undergraduate pre-law students. It is taught in the law school. This position will be designated to an LL.M. candidate with a background in political science and/or jurisprudence, legal practice or clerking experience, and an interest in teaching.
Academic Success, Accelerated J.D. Program for Foreign-Trained Lawyers
  • This position will serve as a source of academic support to a small number (2-6) of candidates within the Accelerated J.D. Program for Foreign-Trained Lawyers. The students in this program are attorneys with their law license from a jurisdiction outside of the United States. More information on the Accelerated J.D. program is available on our website. Additional work under the guidance of the law school's Director of Academic Success will also be included. This position is designed for someone with an interest in building international connections and a small group teaching experience.
Additional graduate and research assistantships may be available. 

Additional Scholarship and Fellowship Opportunities


All LL.M. candidates, including distance students are also able to apply for the Leland Leatherman Cooperative Law Scholarship, the Donald B. Pedersen Scholarships and the Benjamin Franklin Lever Tuition Fellowship. Visit our Costs and Financial Aid webpage for more information.

Qualified candidates will be matched to the appropriate assignment based on their background and experience. Interested applicants should:

1) Apply to the LL.M. Program 
2) Note an interest in one or more of the available positions by a statement included with the application packet. 

Contact us at llm@uark.edu or 479-575-3706 for more information.  

Saturday, February 4, 2017

LL.M. Program Accepting Applications

The LL.M. Program in Agricultural & Food Law is accepting applications for the class beginning in the Fall of 2017. 


For over 35 years, the University of Arkansas has been recognized as the leader in agricultural and food law education. With graduates working in 38 different states and at least 18 foreign countries, our network of alumni is unsurpassed. In addition to our resident faculty, our visiting professors include experts in specialized agricultural and food law topics from Washington D.C., Washington state, California, Iowa, New York, Georgia, North Carolina, and Vermont. Through live video-conferencing, we link with students and professors in other countries, giving our studies a true global reach. Our extensive curriculum reflects both the practical and the policy issues that impact agriculture and our overall food system.

Attending the Program through our face-to-face option allows students to experience the beauty and charm of Fayetteville, Arkansas, a picturesque college town nestled at the foot of the Ozark Mountains.  With a vibrant local food community and an award winning Farmers Market, the Fayetteville food and farm scene complements our academic study.  Fayetteville has been recognized among the best places to live in America by U.S. News & World Report (ranked third in 2016); was listed as one of the top 10 best college towns by Livability.com and was listed as one of the “Best Places for Business and Careers” by Forbes. With a low cost-of-living, a moderate climate, and abundant cultural opportunities, most our students find their living experience almost as rewarding as the studies.




Recognizing that not all of our students cannot join us in Arkansas, we also offer classes by distance instruction.  Distance students can video-conference into the classroom, participating as a member of the class from their home or office.  Classes are recorded for later viewing.  Online courses provide for carefully structured directed learning, often with videos, online participation, and occasional video-conferenced discussion groups.  All of our distance courses are designed with the assistance of the experts working with the University of Arkansas Global Campus, assuring the best quality instruction and design.



There is complete integration between our face-to-face and distance programs, with our distance students always welcome to come to campus and our online courses open to all.

For more information visit our website, follow our blog at agfoodllm, and follow us on Twitter @agfoodlaw.  Or call us at 479.575.3706;  email LLM.uark.edu.


Friday, February 3, 2017

Vade Donaldson joins the Foundry Law Group

Alumni News: Vade Donaldson



We are pleased to report that LL.M. Alumni Vade Donaldson is now serving as a Legal Officer at the Foundry Law Group in Seattle. Below is a segment from Vade's Bio.

Equipped with an intimate knowledge of the challenges that often litter the road between farm and table, Vade helps farmers and food entrepreneurs do what they love and do best—create, innovate, produce, and farm—by navigating the complex laws and regulations in Agricultural and Food Law. 

Click here for more on Vade and the Foundry Law Group




Wednesday, February 1, 2017

Ben Thomas to serve as the new Commissioner of Agriculture in Montana

Alumni News: Ben Thomas





Governor Bullock has selected Ben Thomas to serve as the Director of the Department of Agriculture.  Ben has served in several departments within the US Department of Agriculture throughout his career most recently serving as the Deputy Under Secretary, Marketing and Regulatory Programs.  He received his undergraduate degree from Austin College and went on to earn a Juris Doctorate at Washington University School of Law and a Masters of Laws from the University of Arkansas School of Law in food and agricultural law. He served as legislative aide and counsel for Senator Max Baucus, where he played a lead role in developing the Farm Bill.  Ben was raised on his family’s farm which is still in production today.


Click here for the full announcement.



Monday, January 30, 2017

Request for Proposals: The Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Policy Research Center

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (Letter of Intent Due February 5)


The Socially Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers Policy Research Center is requesting proposals from qualified individuals (henceforth, External Researcher). These qualified individuals should be interested in developing and conducting a comprehensive research study and report on challenges and issues that specifically impact socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers. The submitted research study proposals should focus on current agriculture policy, including the Agricultural Act of 2014 and previous farm bills, and their implications for socially disadvantaged farmers and ranchers.


The hard deadline for individuals, institutions, or organizations that wish to submit a proposal should submit a onepage, electronic, non-binding letter of intent by February 5, 2017, at 5:00 PM. (Central Standard Time) to Cassandra Wilder at chwilder@alcorn.edu




The full RFP is available in PDF form or by visiting the Alcorn.edu site (scroll to bottom).

LL.M. Alum Craig Raysor to serve as Visiting Professor at the University of Tennessee

Alumni News: Craig Raysor


We are pleased to report that LL.M. Alumni Craig Raysor is serving as a Visiting Assistant Professor in a clinical program at the University of Tennessee for the 2016-2017 year within the Clayton Center for Entrepreneurial Law.

As noted on their website, The Clayton Center offers a Visiting Professor Program to attract individuals who are interested in teaching business law courses and who are seeking to enter the academy from private practice or those seeking to make a contribution to the academy or the College of Law community through teaching and scholarship before returning to the private practice of law.

In addition to his teaching, Craig practices law through his law firm, Raysor Legal. His practice focuses on agricultural and food industry clients and business issues. He previously served as
Associate General Counsel for JBS and as a WRO Investigative Attorney for USDA.



Friday, January 27, 2017

Doug O'Brien named Executive Vice President for Programs at National Cooperative Business Association

Alumni News: Doug O'Brien



Our congratulations to LL.M. Alumni Doug O'Brien who was recently named Executive Vice President for Programs with The National Cooperative Business Association CLUSA International. A portion of the announcement is included below. The full announcement is available on PR Newswire.

The National Cooperative Business Association CLUSA International (NCBA CLUSA) is pleased to announce the addition of Doug O'Brien as NCBA CLUSA's Executive Vice President for Programs, effective November 1, 2016.

With a long career focused on empowering people and communities in rural places, O'Brien comes to NCBA CLUSA after serving as Senior Advisor for Rural Affairs on the White House Domestic Policy Council. In his role at the White House, O'Brien led the day-to-day work of the White House Rural Council, which is chaired by the Secretary of Agriculture and composed of cabinet members from across the federal government. The council focused on breaking down silos to make the government have a more positive impact in rural places and has focused on topics such as job creation, rural manufacturing, and child poverty.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Michael T. Roberts Publishes Food Law Treatise: Food Law in the United States

New Treatise:  Food Law in the United States


Our alumnus, Michael Roberts is the author of a new food law treatise, Food Law in the United States.  This comprehensive work lays out the national legal framework for our food system, including not only federal regulation but litigation, state law, and private standards. The treatise covers a broad expanse of topics including commerce, food safety, marketing, nutrition, and emerging food-systems issues such as local food, sustainability, security, urban agriculture, and equity. The book is designed as a reference for lawyers, students and non-law professionals as well as consumer advocates who need to understand food law to advance their respective interests.

This treatise reflects Michael's leadership role in food law & policy.  He is the founding Executive Director of the Resnick Program for Food Law and Policy at the UCLA School of Law where he also teaches a popular course in Food Law & Policy. He is one of the founding members of the Board of Trustees of the new Academy of Food Law & Policy, an academic association of professors teaching and writing in this area.

Michael has guest-lectured on food law subjects at law schools in the U.S., Asia, and Europe. He is a Research Fellow for Renmin University School of Law’s Center for Coordination and Innovation for Food Safety and is an Adjunct Professor of Law for East China University of Science and Technology (Shanghai), where he lectures annually on food law topics. Michael also lectures frequently and is involved with the University of Tuscia, European Food Law Center in Viterbo, Italy. He serves on the advisory board for the World Food Law Institute and on the Editorial Board for MDPI Laws, an open access scholarly journal, which has addressed food law topics.

Michael is not only an alumnus of our LL.M. Program, he is also a former professor on our faculty. He taught our first food law and policy course and helped to found our law school's Journal of Food Law and Policy.

Michael's private practice work includes practice with Venable LLP as a member of the firm's food and agricultural law practice group in Washington, D.C. and special counsel to the Roll Global farming and food companies headquartered in Los Angeles, where he was responsible for global food regulation, trade, and public policy.

Michael has always been a good friend to our Program and will will be guest lecturing in our Federal Regulation of Food Safety course this semester.

Sunday, January 22, 2017

LL.M. Alumnus & Author - Baylen Linnekin - "Biting the Hands That Feed Us"

In September 2016, our alumnus, Baylen Linnekin published the book, Biting the Hands That Feed Us: How Fewer, Smarter Laws Would Make Our Food System More Sustainable.  


Published by Island Press, the book describes four broad failings of our current food system relating to food safety regulations, food waste, "big food," and sustainable practices at home.  The book combines personal stories of those in the food system with peer-reviewed legal research. It's a powerful call for "fewer, smarter" food laws.

In December, Biting the Hands That Feed Us was recognized by Civil Eats as one of their "Favorite Food and Farm Books of 2016."  As Kristine Wong described it: 

Laws and regulations are designed to help us, right? When it comes to building a sustainable food movement, that may not always be true. In this provocative book, lawyer Baylen Linnekin makes a case for why U.S. food policy might benefit from a “less is more” approach. He shares examples of how laws have created unnecessary food waste, prevented residents from growing food in home gardens, and overburdened small producers and growers with regulations requiring them to use pricey equipment—instead of less expensive methods that would achieve similar outcomes. Linnekin leaves the reader with guiding principles of how we can transform food policy in a direction that promotes—not inhibits—sustainability.
Baylen has taught food law & policy courses at George Mason University and American University and was the founder of Keep Food Legal.  His editorials have been published by the Boston Globe, the New York Post, Newsweek, Playboy, Reason, Huffington Post and others. He is frequently asked to comment on food issues by the media and is a frequent presenter at food law conferences.  Baylen is also one of the founders of the new Academy of Food Law & Policy, an academic organization of professors teaching and writing in the emerging area of food law & policy.

We wish Baylen continued success in his writing and congratulate him on his work.

Friday, January 20, 2017

Just Food? Forum on Labor Across the Food System - Call for Proposals


Just Food? Forum on Labor Across the Food System- Call for Proposals


Event Type:
Conference

Conference Date:
April 1, 2017

Location:
Harvard Law School

Contact Email:
harvard.justfood@gmail.com


Just Food? is a student-organized collaboration of the Harvard Law School Food Law Society and Harvard Food Literacy Project and co-sponsored by the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic.

Call for proposals

Submissions Due: January 23rd, 2017

Does your work connect to food and labor? Are you studying the players in our food system, and how their roles and rights have changed over time? The Harvard Just Food? Forum seeks proposals that focus on all aspects of labor across the food system. You may be working in the tomato fields in Florida, studying worker ownership models or making a film about fair labor practices-- we’re interested in hearing from you. We especially encourage proposals from people who can speak from their own experiences, alongside advocates, film makers, and academics. We are seeking two different types of proposals:

  • Concurrent sessions: Workshop, talk or panel format to educate and share research and knowledge of a topic and spark conversation and ideas.
  • Posters and exhibits: Scholars and entrepreneurs are invited to showcase their work.


Potential Topics

Agricultural labor
Food service/ restaurant labor
Labor rights and inequality
Food entrepreneurs
Labeling and certifications
Regulatory responses to labor issues
Role of media
Models of food labor and ownership (e.g. cooperative, non-profit, corporate social responsibility)
Prison farm labor
Impact of technology
Suggest your own!


For more info or to submit a proposal visit the conference site.

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Nicole Civita interviewed by Huffington Post

Nicole Civita interviewed by The Huffington Post in an article highlighting Food Waste Among the Wealthy

View the full article by clicking below






Friday, December 16, 2016

Professor Schneider to present at AALS - Farmland Tenure: Who Owns the Global Food System

An invitation from Professor Schneider...


Please join me at the Agricultural & Food Law Section program at the American Association of Law School's (AALS) annual meeting in San Francisco. Our session is scheduled for Friday, January 6, 2017 from 1:30 - 3:15.

Farmland Tenure: Who Owns the Global Food System


Farmland is uniquely tied to food security. It is this land, and the soil that it is made up of, that truly feeds the world. Farmland also, however, sustains local rural communities, is a source of political power, and is intractably tied to the rural economy of a nation. As we begin to feel the effects of global climate change, the value of farmland has increased, and many new investment strategies have arisen. How will the food system, local economies, and environment be impacted? This session explores how farmland tenure affects food security, natural resource consumption, environmental sustainability, rural livelihoods, and political power. An introduction to global land tenure trends will be provided, followed by presentations that target three discreet perspectives: U.S. farmland tenure in a generational transition, land tenure struggles in developing nations, and complex land tenure issues that arise on U.S. tribal lands.

Our speakers and their tentative topics will be:

Neil Hamilton, Drake Law School (Overview of US land tenure issues; implications);


Jessica Shoemaker, University of Nebraska College of Law (overview of special land tenure issues in Indian Country);



Frédéric Mousseau, The Oakland Institute (presentation on Oakland Institute perspectives, initiative)



Uche Ewelukwa, University of Arkansas School of Law (perspectives on international land tenure issues).





Wednesday, December 14, 2016

New Positions Announced for 2017-18 Academic Year

The LL.M. Program in Agricultural & Food Law is now accepting applications for the class beginning in the Fall of 2017. We are pleased to announce three new assistantship opportunities
that provide for a full tuition waiver, plus a monthly stipend. Candidates selected for these positions are enrolled as full-time degree candidates in the LL.M. Program, with part time work duties designed to enhance their career development and build their professional resumes. Only face-to-face LL.M. candidates are eligible for these positions.

Advisor, The Journal of Food Law & Policy, The Arkansas Law Review, and Arkansas Law Notes

  • This position calls for an LL.M. candidate to help guide the three student-edited publications at the law school, the Journal of Food Law & Policy, the Arkansas Law Review, and Arkansas Law Notes. Duties will include advising the student Boards and assisting with the teaching of a specialized course in scholarly writing. This position will be designated to an LL.M. candidate with a background of service on a law review or journal and a demonstrated interest in academic scholarship. 

Adjunct Instructor, Political Science Pre-Law 

  • This position includes service as an adjunct instructor teaching a course in "The Judicial Process" within the Political Science Department in the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences. This class explores the the U.S. legal system and is designed for undergraduate pre-law students. It is taught in the law school. This position will be designated to an LL.M. candidate with a background in political science and/or jurisprudence, legal practice or clerking experience, and an interest in teaching.

Academic Success, Accelerated J.D. Program for Foreign-Trained Lawyers

  • This position will serve as a source of academic support to a small number (2-6) of candidates within the Accelerated J.D. Program for Foreign-Trained Lawyers. The students in this program are attorneys with their law license from a jurisdiction outside of the United States. More information on the Accelerated J.D. program is available on our website. Additional work under the guidance of the law school's Director of Academic Success will also be included. This position is designed for someone with an interest in building international connections and a small group teaching experience.

Qualified candidates will be matched to the appropriate assignment based on their background and experience. Interested applicants should:

1) Apply to the LL.M. Program 
2) Note an interest in one or more of the available positions by a statement included with the application packet. 

Contact us at llm@uark.edu or 479-575-3706 for more information.  

Monday, December 12, 2016

Indigenous Food & Ag Initiative to Help Quapaw Tribe With Processing Plant

Bumpers College, School of Law Help Quapaw Tribe With Processing Plant


The University of Arkansas Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences and School of Law are collaborating to assist in the design and construction of a meat processing plant for the Quapaw tribe near Miami, Oklahoma.

Janie Hipp, Director of the Indigenous Food & Agricultural Initiative was on hand during the groundbreaking ceremony in August. The plant is expected to be operational in May, 2017, and will provide U of A students with opportunities for experience and training. The plant will include a classroom, laboratory and test kitchen, and is being designed to process up to 50 animals per week.

The tribe has cattle and bison on a ranch outside Miami. The ultimate goal of the ranch is to raise, slaughter, process, package and ship its own products to local businesses and stores, including the tribe’s restaurants in Quapaw Casino and Downstream Casino Resort.

Read the full UA Newswire article for more on this exciting collaboration.


Saturday, December 10, 2016

Amy White given The Compass Achievement Award

LL.M. Alumna Amy White given The Compass Achievement Award

Amy White was recently given the Compass Achievement Award for her work on Walmart's "best if used by"  initiative for private brand items. Amy serves as Senior Manager of Food Labeling at Walmart,  working under Frank Yiannas, Vice President of Food Safety on the labeling initiative. The Award recognizes Amy for "outstanding achievement to execute a date labeling initiative that reduced food waste and lessened the likelihood of all-justified regulatory violation."

Walmart has received international recognition for its efforts to reduce food waste through improved package labeling, with Amy's efforts at the forefront. More on Walmart's labeling initiative can be found the U.S. edition of the The Guardian newspaper.

Amy's award was presented to her by Jay Jorgensen, Executive Vice President, Global Chief Ethics, and Compliance Officer for WalMart.









Thursday, December 8, 2016

Erin S. Parker appointed to Council for Native American Farming and Ranching

Erin S. Parker appointed to Council for Native American Farming and Ranching


We are pleased to share the news that LL.M. Alumna Erin S. Parker has been appointed to the Council for Native American Farming & Ranching.

The Council provides recommendations to the Secretary of Agriculture on changes to USDA regulations and other measures that would eliminate barriers to program participation for Native American farmers and ranchers.

The Council consists of 15 members, including four USDA officials and 11 Native American leaders and representatives. Members of the Council are appointed for two-year terms by the Secretary of Agriculture. The appointees may include: Native American (American Indian and Alaska Native) farmers or ranchers; representatives of nonprofit organizations that work with Native farmers and ranchers; civil rights professionals; educators; tribal elected leaders; senior USDA officials; and other persons the Secretary deems appropriate.

Erin serves as the Assistant Director of the Indigenous Food & Agriculture Initiative at the University of Arkansas School of Law.

For more on Erin's appointment, read the full announcement as posted on Farm Futures. 

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

LL.M. Candidate Kael Bowling wins Food Safety Champion Award

LL.M. Candidate Kael Bowling wins Food Safety Champion Award

Kael Bowling and Frank Yiannas
LL.M. Candidate Kael Bowling was recently given a Food Safety Champion award for his work researching industry initiatives for Walmart Food Safety & Health. Kael was selected to participate in an externship during the fall semester serving under Senior Manager of Food Labeling, Amy White, who is also an alumna of the program. Kael is pictured with Frank Yiannas, Vice President of Food Safety. Congratulations Kael!





Thursday, November 24, 2016

Happy Thanksgiving

We'd like to wish all our alumni, our current candidates, our friends and colleagues a wonderful Thanksgiving. We are thankful for the good agricultural and food law work that you do - improving and supporting our food system one client, case, memo at a time.

Our diverse alumni are working in 38 states and 19 different countries, and we are particularly thankful that they carry our reputation for excellence worldwide.

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

USDA Associate Counsel David Grahn Returns to Teach


Agricultural Policy & the Federal Budget with David Grahn


This week we were joined by USDA Associate General Counsel, David Grahn. David joins us each fall to teach a condensed course titled Agricultural Policy & the Federal Budget.

The course explores the impact of the Office of Management and Budget and the cost scoring system on policy making. David delivers a fast paced and real world explanation of how things work inside the Beltway, how budgetary rules often drive policy decisions, and how policymakers need to understand the process in order to advance their causes.

David is a special friend of the Program, and teaches this course on his own time - and not in his official capacity at the USDA. He brings a wealth of policy experience and inside-Washington expertise to the task.

David serves at the USDA Office of General Counsel as Associate General Counsel for International Affairs, Food Assistance, and Farm and Rural Programs. He represents the interests of a wide range of USDA entities: Farm Service Agency, Risk Management Agency / Federal Crop Insurance Corporation, Rural Development Agency, Rural Business Service, Rural Utilities Service, Foreign Agricultural Service, the Food and Nutrition Service, and the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.



Thursday, November 17, 2016

Food Law & Policy in the Trump Era: Call for Papers

The information below is posted on behalf of the Journal of Food Law & Policy at the University of Arkansas School of Law. 


Interest in food law and policy grew rapidly during the Obama administration. An emboldened food movement increasingly challenged corporate food and agricultural interests, while many academics, policymakers, and consumers began to promote food system reform as an attractive route to broader societal change. Writing about the future of food politics, Michael Pollan recently noted, “the culture of food is shifting underfoot.”

With the election of Donald Trump, however, agribusiness appears to be ascendant again. His transition team has made the concerns of large-scale agriculture paramount, promising to weaken or eliminate regulations throughout the food chain. Trump’s election has also highlighted the increasing political divide between rural and urban America. Once the wellspring of radical politics in the United States, rural America—and its farmers—are now among the most conservative segments of American society.

The Journal of Food Law and Policy invites essays examining food law and policy in the Trump era. Essays should provide analysis and commentary rather than research results and may be on a variety of topics, including the environmental regulation of agriculture, labor, food justice, anti-trust law, rural America, and animal welfare, among others. We welcome submissions from academics from all disciplines, as well as practitioners, policymakers, and advocates.

Interested individuals should submit proposals with an abstract of 100 to 250 words, a short bio, and their contact information to foodlaw@uark.edu by December 15th. Final manuscripts will be due on February 1st and should be no longer than 2,500 words.




Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Nicole Cook featured on Good Food Jobs

Recent LL.M. Candidate Nicole Cook is featured this week on Good Food Jobs, a website "designed to link people in search of meaningful food work with the businesses that need their energy, enthusiasm, and intellect". Nicole is also featured on the sites companion blog the gastrognomes where she talks about her current position as Senior Advisor to the Administrator for the Risk Management Agency in the Office of the Under Secretary for Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services. 



Friday, November 11, 2016

Animal Law Attorney Pamela Vesilind visits LL.M. Program

LL.M. Alumna and Adjunct Professor Pamela Vesilind visits LL.M. Program 
























Pamela Vesilind, graduate of Vermont Law School and an Alumna of our own LL.M. Program in Agricultural & Food Law joined the LL.M. Program today to lead a discussion on Animal Welfare and Farmed Animals Raised for Food in a segment for Professor Schneider's Food Farming & Sustainability course. Pamela is a recognized Scholar in Animal Law and is an Adjunct Instructor at Vermont Law School and the LL.M. Program in Agricultural & Food Law at the University of Arkansas School of Law. Pamela now practices Animal Law in North Carolina.



Sunday, November 6, 2016

National Food Law Student Leadership Summit

This year, we have been delighted to have Kelly Nuchols with us as a full time face-to-face LL.M. candidate.  Kelly's participation in the LL.M. Program is sponsored by the Drake Agricultural Law Center led by Professor Neil Hamilton. Kelly worked closely with Professor Hamilton and Harvard's Emily Broad Leib in the planning and hosting of the Food Law Leadership Summit held this year at Drake University Law School in October. Arkansas professors Susan Schneider and Nate Rosenberg were delighted to participate in the Summit. We asked Kelly to describe the Summit in a blog post for us -


From LL.M. Candidate Kelly Nuchols:

In October, 80 law students from at least 46 different law schools gathered in Des Moines, Iowa for the second Food Law Student Leadership Summit. The Summit was co-hosted by the Drake Agricultural Law Center, the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC), and the Food Law Student Network Leadership Committee.

Summit organizers, Emily Broad Leib and Neil Hamilton
The Summit host team included some familiar faces to the Arkansas LL.M. program, including LL.M. candidate and soon-to-be-alumna Christina Rice who is serving as a Clinic Fellow at FLPC, visiting professor Neil Hamilton, who serves as the Director of Drake’s Agricultural Law Center, and Jennifer Zwagerman, an LL.M. alumna who serves the Drake Law School's Director of Career Development and the Associate Director of the Agricultural Law Center.  The Summit would not have been possible without the hard work of the FLPC team of Emily Broad Leib, Emma Clippinger, Lee Miller, and Christina, and the Drake team of Neil, Matt Russell, and Jennifer.

Students, organizers, and professors enjoy the Des Moines Farmers Market
As a Drake Law alumna and former FLPC intern, it was an honor to welcome everyone to Drake Law School for the summit. The Des Moines setting gave students a taste of Iowa agriculture with visits to both the Jackson Family Farm and the Des Moines Downtown Farmers’ Market. The students also toured a family owned artisan cured meat company, La Quercia. I am thankful I was able to share the learning opportunities I had in Iowa, and at Drake and FLPC, with the students who attended this year’s summit.

 Susan Schneider and Arkansas Law Visiting Professor Nate Rosenberg were two of the professors who taught a food law seminar at this year’s Summit.
Susan Schneider presents on the legal aspects of food names
At last year’s Food Law Student Leadership Summit at Harvard Law School, I realized how important this opportunity is for students who are interested in food law. For several students, the Summit was their first chance to participate in a food law class.  These classes exposed students to the variety of food law topics and career opportunities that exist. For example, Nate presented on “Inequality and Agriculture,” while Susan spoke about “Food Law: What’s in the Name of a Product?”

Nate Rosenberg presents on inequality and agriculture
The Summit Students also heard a keynote address from a leader in the field, Ricardo Salvador, who is the Director of the Food and Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. Then, students used the information they learned over the weekend, along with their prior knowledge, to brainstorm realistic solutions to some of the problems facing our food system.

The Summit was a momentous event for these students, as they begin to pursue careers as food law attorneys, professors, or perhaps even as future LL.M. in Agricultural and Food Law candidates.
The Summit would not have been possible without the generous support from the Charles M. Haar Food and Health Law and Policy Fund, the Lillian Goldman Charitable Trust, and the GRACE Communications Foundation.

Other photos from the Summit posted by Susan below-  with more found on the Food Law Student Network website.

Kelly Nuchols addressing the Summit audience



Friend and colleague, Emily Broad Leib, whose vision
created the Summit 
Jabari Brown, Univ. of Oregon Law (2017)
Executive Committee FLSN



Saturday, October 29, 2016

LL.M. Visiting Prof Receives Highest Honor at the AALA Annual Conference; Alumni Lead the Association

Congratulations to our dear friend and visiting professor, David Grahn.  Earlier this month, David received the Distinguished Service Award at the American Agricultural Law Association's 2016 Annual Symposium in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

The distinguished service award is given to a member of the AALA that demonstrates “sustained excellence” and a consistent "demonstration of dedication to furthering the development of agricultural law, strengthening the legal profession, increasing the size and influence of AALA, and fulfilling the law-related information needs of lawyers and citizens alike." It is the highest award to be bestowed on a member.

David teaches our Farm Policy & the Federal Budget course, a fast-paced condensed class that explains the impact of the budget on policy decisions.  He will be teaching this course for us next month.

David serves as the Associate General Counsel for International Affairs, Food Assistance, and Farm and Rural Programs in the Office of the General Counsel of the USDA. In 2011, he was awarded the Meritorious Presidential Rank Award for his service to the U.S. Government. He is a prior recipient of the AALA Excellence in Agriculture Award, a frequent presenter at the AALA Annual Educational Symposium and dedicated AALA member He is a Graduate of the University of Minnesota Law School and Carleton College in Minnesota.

LL.M. Alumni continue to play an important role in the leadership of the AALA.  Our Alumna, Beth Crocker is the out-going Past President of the AALA. She is pictured above, giving David his award.

Beth did an outstanding job as President-elect, planning the AALA conference in South Carolina last year and this year, running the AALA organization as its President.  Thank you, Beth.

The incoming President-Elect is another of our alumni, Jennifer Zwaggerman. We are delighted to also congratulate Jennie for her selection for this important role. We are confident that she will provide positive leadership to the association as she plans the next conference and then ascends to the position of President.

Alumnus Jeff Peterson continues to serve on the AALA Board of Directors, as does Beth Crocker who will serve on the Board as Past-President. Alumna Beth Rumley will join them, as she was appointed to serve out the remainder of Jennie Zwaggerman's term on the Board.  Congratulations to Beth Rumley, and our appreciation is extended to Jennie, Jeff, Beth, and Beth for their service.

A number of our alumni presented at the conference:

  • Susan Schneider: 2016 Food Law Update
  • Janie Hipp and Erin Shirl: American Indian Legal Issues in Food & Agriculture;
  • Alli Condra: Recent Changes in Food Law: Regulation, Litigation, and Legislative Update;
  • Alison Peck:  The Science and Law of Genetic Engineering; and, 
  • Andy Frame: Advising Food and Farm Start-ups.

And, our Visiting Professors David Grahn and Neil Hamilton each spoke. David delivered his 2016 Farm Policy Update.  Neil spoke on How Private Conservation and Sustainability Initiatives Impact Farmers.

We were once again proud of the leadership and professionalism shown by our alumni and professors. We are proud to play a significant role in the AALA.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Spring Schedule Announced






The University of Arkansas School of Law is proud to deliver an extensive curriculum of agricultural and food law classes each semester.

JD students from other law schools may be able to enroll in these courses, arranging for transfer credit back to their home institution. Enrollment is on a space-available basis, and a simple application process is required. There is no application fee, and Arkansas’ reasonable tuition rates apply.

Attorneys seeking additional expertise may be able to enroll in some of these courses without participating in the degree program. Enrollment is on a space-available basis, and a simple application process is required. CLE credit is available in some jurisdictions.

Contact Sarah Hiatt, LL.M. Program Administrator at sxh090@uark.edu to enroll. 

Traditional Semester Courses
Traditional courses meet each week for either the full semester or condensed to meet only half of the semester. Distance students conference into the class, participating from wherever they are located.
 

Agricultural Biotechnology
Martha Noble (via video conference from California) (1 credit)
10:30 - 12:10 Wednesday (second half of the semester only)
Study of the regulation of agricultural biotechnology, including the approval process for new technologies, the patenting of new products and technologies, and the restrictions associated with their use.

Environmental Regulation of Agriculture
Nathan Rosenberg (2 credits)
12:50 - 1:50 Tuesday & Thursday
Examination of some of the major federal environmental statutes applicable to agricultural operations with attention to current cases and controversies under those laws. The course also explores the regulatory authority and enforcement practices of the EPA and other agencies.

Intellectual Property in Food & Agric. Products
Uche Ewelukwa (1 credit)
10:30 - 12:30 (first half of the semester)
Introduction to Copyright Law, Trademarks Law and Patent Law as applied to agriculture and food, considering Trademark Law, such as Certification Marks (e.g. Idaho Potatoes), Geographical Indicators (e.g. Rooibos Tea; Grana Padano cheese), Trade Dress (e.g. whether the shape of an Easter chocolate bunny is protectable under trademark law) and issues from Copyright Law including copyright laws on food recipes as well as copyright laws on food labeling as well as issues involving Design Patent Law.

Regulated Markets in Agriculture
Nate Rosenberg (2 credits)
8:40 - 10:20 Tuesday
Introduction to the federal statutes and mechanisms designed to regulate the livestock and the fruit and vegetable industries: Marketing Orders, The Perishable Commodities Act, and the Packers and Stockyards Act; Review of administrative appeal opportunities through formal and informal adjudication.

Flipped Courses with Some Synchronous Classes

Flipped classes combine weekly guided study for students to do independently, with scheduled opportunities for class discussion lead by the course instructor. Students may participate in these discussions via videoconference or in person in the LL.M. Study. The amount of class time varies course to course.

Federal Regulation of Food Labeling
Satoko Kato (2 credits)
10:30 - 12:30 Tuesday (first half of the semester only)
Study of the federal laws regarding the labeling of food. The course includes the study of nutrition labeling, health claims, advertising issues, and efforts to impact public health through educational labeling. This course will meet for 100 minutes/week, but only for the first half of the semester. Student projects, video presentations and other guided instruction will be provided.

Federal Regulation of Food Safety
Satoko Kato (2 credits)     
10:30 - 12:30 Tuesday (second half of the semester only)

Study of efforts to promote food safety through federal regulation. The course will examine a variety of discreet topics including FSMA food safety provisions, “defect” standards, chemical residues, environmental pollution, antibiotic resistance, and new concerns about health and diet. This course will meet for 100 minutes/week, but only for the last half of the semester. Student projects, video presentations and other guided instruction will be provided.

Food Justice Law & Policy
Nicole Civita (via video conference from Vermont) (1 credit)
10:30 - 11:20 Thursday (first half of the semester; class will only meet 4-5 times)
Survey of the legal and policy issues raised by the food justice movement. Topics covered include food insecurity and poverty, public health concerns such as obesity, the economics of healthy eating, food deserts, and food waste. This course will only meet 4-5 times during the semester for synchronous discussion.

Condensed Courses
Condensed courses meet for 2-4 days, with 12-14 hours of intense instruction for 1 credit

Food Safety Litigation
Bill Marler/Denis Stearns (1 credit)
2-3 days in March TBD          
Examination of food borne illness litigation with an initial introduction to food product liability followed by the study of actual cases brought against food manufacturers

Legal Issues in Agricultural Land Tenure
Neil Hamilton (1 credit)          
2-3 days in April TBD
Legal issues regarding the sale of agricultural lands via mortgage and contract for deed; Sustainability and land tenure; Leasing issues; Farm transition and land tenure issues

Federal Farm Programs & Crop Insurance
Allen Olson (1 credit)
3-4 days in February TBD      
Overview of the major federal farm programs and the legal issues associated with participation; Overview of the crop insurance program and the roles of those involved Discussion of the legal issues that arise

Agriculture & Climate Change         
Nate Rosenberg (1 credit)
3-4 days in January; this course may be offered as a semi-condensed or half-semester class. If you are interested, please let us know your preferences.
Discussion of climate change and farming, including consideration of relevant farm practices, farm programs and policy issues, regulatory issues and possible litigation

Online Courses
Online courses are delivered primarily through guided self-paced student work based on a carefully designed learning pathway; there may be a few synchronous class meetings, but most contact with the professor will be individualized through email, video calls, and other forms of direct communication; these courses provide maximum scheduling flexibility.

Agricultural Cooperatives & Local Food Systems (1 credit)
Lauren Manning (Arkansas)
March 7 - April 28      
Introduction to the legal structure of a cooperative and examination of the recent use of the cooperative model in encouraging local and regional food systems.

Agricultural Labor Law (1 credit)
Amy Lowenthal (New York)
January 17 - March 3
Study of the legal, social, and economic issues that arise from the extensive use of migrant labor in U.S. agricultural operations. Topics include agricultural exemptions from labor laws, the Migrant & Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, and agriculture’s reliance on undocumented alien workers.

Farmed Animal Welfare Law & Policy (1 credit)
Pamela Vesilind (North Carolina)
January 17 - March 3
Examination of the legal issues involved in determining welfare standards for animals raised for food. In addition to introducing federal animal welfare and humane slaughter laws, state referenda, state law standards, and so-called “ag gag” laws are considered. 

Federal Nutrition Law & Policy (1 credit)
Erin Shirl (Arkansas)
March 7 - April 28
Study of federal nutrition policy, including the development of the federal nutrition standards, the framework for the food assistance programs, the federal school lunch program, and the government’s efforts to encourage healthy eating.

Introduction to Agricultural Income Tax (1 credit) 
Poppy Davis (California)
March 7 - April 28      
Overview of federal income tax law as applied to agricultural operations. This course de-mystifies agricultural taxation and explains the importance of these issues for anyone advising a farming operation.