Thursday, June 30, 2016

Fall Schedule Announced

We are pleased to offer a full curriculum of specialized LL.M. courses each semester. For Fall 2016, we will be offering our usual core courses, plus an exciting mix of new classes that address some of the most compelling new issues in agricultural and food law today. Contact us at llm@uark.edu or 479-575-3706 for more information.
 

Food Law & Policy
Susan Schneider
2 credit full-semester course
Wednesday, 10:00 – 11:40 a.m.

An introduction to the network of laws that govern our food system. An overview of regulation by both the Food & Drug Administration and the USDA is provided. Policy considerations are discussed in light of current issues. 

Agriculture & the Environment
Christopher Kelley
2 credit full-semester course
Thursday, 9:00 – 10:40 a.m.

Agriculture is increasingly criticized for its impact on the environment. This course examines the tensions between the desire to produce food and fiber efficiently and concern for sustainability and the protection of natural resources. 

Food, Farming & Sustainability (Survey of Agricultural Law)
Susan Schneider
2 credit full-semester course
Friday, 10:00 – 11:40 a.m.

This course provides a survey of the complex legal topics that make up the body of agricultural and food law focusing on current issues of significance. 
 
The Right to Food
Uche Ewelukwa
1 credit half-semester course
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 – 11:50 a.m.

This course will provide an overview of the historical development of the right to food; evaluate the rights, obligations and responsibilities of rights-holders and duty-bearers of the right to food; and examine legal and non-legal mechanisms that are increasingly used to adjudicate the right to food. 

Business, Human Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility in the Food/Ag Sector
Uche Ewelukwa
1 credit half-semester course
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 – 11:50 a.m.

The course explores the business-human rights nexus with a particular focus on the food and agricultural sector and on case studies from around the world. The course introduces students to the linkages between business and human rights from a variety of (legal, regulatory, and policy) perspectives.  

Specialized Legal Research and Writing
Christopher Kelley
1 credit full-semester course
Tuesday, 10:00 – 10:50 a.m.

Legal writing skill development, including training in plain-English legal writing, electronic research training, and publication strategies. This course will assist students in planning to meet the LL.M. writing requirement.


Urban Agriculture Law & Policy
Nicole Civita
1 credit half semester distance course
Thursday, 3:40 – 5:00 p.m. (beginning Sept. 22 and concluding Nov. 3)

Study of the legal issues raised by the rising interest in urban agricultural activities. Topics of study include land use and zoning issues, farmers market issues, and legal issues associated with community-sponsored agriculture. 

An Introduction to the Law of Food & Agriculture
Neil Hamilton
1 credit condensed course
Scheduled for Aug. 17- 19, 2016

Introductory course that provides an overview of the legal and policy issues presented by the production of food and fiber, including a discussion of structural changes in agriculture, sustainability issues, and trends in consumer interest.


Agricultural Policy & the Federal Budget
David Grahn
1 credit condensed course
Scheduled for Nov. 9 – 11, 2016 (tentative)

Study of the impact of the Office of Management and Budget and the cost scoring system on federal agricultural policy making in Washington, D.C. Current farm policy issues are discussed within the context of budgetary constraints and pressures. 


Independent Research in Agricultural & Food Law
 (1-2 credits)

Independent research in agricultural and food law conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. 

Advanced Legal Research & Writing

 (1 credit independent writing project; satisfies the legal writing requirement; grade based on final written product)

Research in a specialized area of agricultural or food law and development of a paper that demonstrates rigorous legal analysis and quality legal writing.







Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Courses in Agricultural & Food Law open to expanded audience






J.D. students, practicing attorneys, and graduate students in related disciplines may be allowed to enroll in our specialized agricultural and food law classes for non-degree credit. 

LL.M. alumni and other attorneys can take many of the LL.M. classes, and the class may qualify for CLE credit (subject to their state CLE rules).

Interested students and attorneys should contact the Program Administrator, Sarah Hiatt  at llm@uark.edu for the current class schedule and information about enrollment.


Join us in Fayetteville or online for any of the following:

Regular semester courses (Face-to-face classes with synchronous participation by distance students and classroom capture)
 

Food Law & Policy
Susan Schneider
2 credit full-semester course 
Wednesday, 10:00 – 11:40 a.m.

An introduction to the network of laws that govern our food system. An overview of regulation by both the Food & Drug Administration and the USDA is provided. Policy considerations are discussed in light of current issues.  



Agriculture & the Environment
Christopher Kelley
2 credit full-semester course
Thursday, 9:00 – 10:40 a.m.

Agriculture is increasingly criticized for its impact on the environment. This course examines the tensions between the desire to produce food and fiber efficiently and concern for sustainability and the protection of natural resources.  



Food, Farming & Sustainability (Survey of Agricultural Law)
Susan Schneider
2 credit full-semester course
Friday, 10:00 – 11:40 a.m.

This course provides a survey of the complex legal topics that make up the body of agricultural and food law focusing on current issues of significance.  



Flipped Classes (distance courses with independent work outside of the classroom combined with synchronous lecture and discussion)
 
The Right to Food
Uche Ewelukwa
1 credit half-semester course
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 – 11:50 a.m.

This course will provide an overview of the historical development of the right to food; evaluate the rights, obligations and responsibilities of rights-holders and duty-bearers of the right to food; and examine legal and non-legal mechanisms that are increasingly used to adjudicate the right to food.
  

Business, Human Rights and Corporate Social Responsibility in the Food/Ag Sector
Uche Ewelukwa
1 credit half-semester course
Tuesday, Thursday 11:00 – 11:50 a.m.

The course explores the business-human rights nexus with a particular focus on the food and agricultural sector and on case studies from around the world. The course introduces students to the linkages between business and human rights from a variety of (legal, regulatory, and policy) perspectives.  



Urban Agriculture Law & Policy
Nicole Civita
1 credit half semester distance course
Thursday, 3:40 – 5:00 p.m. (beginning Sept. 22 and concluding Nov. 3)

Study of the legal issues raised by the rising interest in urban agricultural activities. Topics of study include land use and zoning issues, farmers market issues, and legal issues associated with community-sponsored agriculture.  






 



Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Fulbright Scholar Opportunities in the field of Law

 
The Fulbright Scholar Program offers teaching, research or combined teaching and research awards in over 125 countries for the 2017-2018 academic year. Opportunities are available for college and university faculty and administrators, as well as for legal professionals and independent scholars.
 
This year, the Fulbright Scholar Program is offering over 90 awards in the field of Law. Exciting opportunities are available in many countries, including but not limited to:


 
We recently hosted a webinar on Fulbright opportunities in law. Staff provided an overview of awards open to academics and professionals, and a 2015-16 Fulbright alumnus spoke about his experiences and answered questions. Please follow this link to listen to the recording.  
 
For further awards in the field of Law, please visit our new Opportunities in Law webpage. There you will find award highlights and examples of successful projects in the discipline.
 
For eligibility factors, detailed application guidelines and review criteria, please follow this link. Interested scholars may also wish to join My Fulbright, a resource center for applicants interested in the program.

 Applicants must be U.S. citizens and the current competition will close on August 1, 2016.
 
We are happy to answer any questions you may have regarding any of the opportunities listed above or the Fulbright Scholar Program in general. 
 
The Fulbright Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, is the U.S. government’s flagship international exchange program and is supported by the people of the United States and partner countries around the world. For more information, visit eca.state.gov/fulbright.

Friday, June 3, 2016

Alumni Update: Marne Coit

Congratulations to LL.M. Alumna Marne Coit, whose recent article Support for Local Food in the 2014 Farm Bill was published in the most recent edition of the Drake Journal of Agricultural Law.

A 2007 LL.M. graduate, Marne continues to work at the forefront of food law, specifically at the intersection of sustainable agriculture, food systems and the law. In August of 2015, she presented on legal issues for farmer veterans for the National Center for Appropriate Technology (NCAT)’s training, Armed to Farm at Houghton College in New York.  She also moderated the panel Local Food Ventures: Advising Clients on Food Hubs, Cooperatives and Working with Farmer Veterans at the 2015 American Agricultural Law Association (AALA) Annual Educational Symposium in Charleston, SC.  She also presented ton Local Food Provisions in the 2014 Farm Bill, the subject of her article published in the Drake Journal of Agricultural Law.

Marne is currently teaching in this area as well. Since 2013 she has been teaching Food Systems Law & Policy, an online course in the Sustainable MBA program at Marylhurst University. The MBA in Sustainable Business is an accelerated online degree for working professionals. Because the degree is committed to producing managers with a systems perspective on the role of business in society, each concentration includes a course in environmental law. The Food Systems Management version is the course in Food Systems Policy & Law, which examines current issues in food regulation, health and safety, access to food and food justice. According to Paul Ventura, Chair of Sustainable Business Programs, Marne’s “academic background in anthropology and law, along with her active engagement in community food systems has made [her] an ideal "pracademic" for teaching in our MBA.”

Marne is also pleased to be teaching the inaugural food policy class at the Bard Center for Environmental Policy. The Bard Center for Environmental Policy offers MS degrees in Environmental Policy and Climate Science and Policy. The program recently added a required sequence of applied policy classes, one focused on food systems, the other energy systems. “Meeting global food and energy requirements sustainably will be the defining challenge of the 21st century,” according to program Director Eban Goodstein. “Marne was a great fit for the course, bringing a unique background, combining food policy experience here in the Northeast with the LLM degree.”

We are proud of Marne's work and congratulate her on her many accomplishments.